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of the government, the current effort in afghanistan and condition of the u.s. economy, all referenced in the president's speech. here is how you can talk to us the first half hour. president obama saying last night it is time to turn the page. your interpretation of that. phone, e-mail, or twitter. again, if you want to give an e- mail, journal@c-span.org and twitter, go to twitter and then c-spanwj. "the washington post" use is that " for its story tonight. turning to "the new york times." and going to "usa today" -- again, the president quote. conn. mary on hours democrats line. caller: good morning, pedro. i wanted to say how proud i am of president obama fulfilling another of his campaign commitments. i wish to the iraqi people well in governing themselves. and i agree with the president that it is time that we concentrates on our economy and what happened to the people in the middle class. i hope he does stand strong on inundating -- eliminating the tax credit that was given to the very wealthy, by discontinuing that at the end of the year. host: raleigh, north carolina. john, re
with the till look -- tillamook burn. never. we used to have a very high rate of employment, with a relatively high average, annual salary when the mills were operating. we no longer have mills. what in the hell are we doign to this -- doing to this state? >> do you want to share any thoughts on the east side forest plan my colleague has been trying to put together to get out of this deadlock? >> it all works soemtimes. -- sometimes. but every time that something gets going, it goes to the courts. we are stymied. >> thank you very much. whenever i am hiding in that area, you often see -- hiking in that area, you often see completely overgrown, second- growth forests that are not serving their purpose and are often a source of disease, a potential fire hazard. it is a lose-lose-lose situation. there are a number of things that we need to push forward on. one is the thinning which produces a steady supply of logs, better timber stands, and improves the ecosystem. nothing moves past in this world, but another piece was -- senator wyden and i thought to get money to help for us to thinning. a seco
. this is a reaction to what another country is doing to us. china is restraining its currency unilaterally. i wish they were not. i wish they were allowing their currencies to more liberally fluctuate with its true accommodating value. but if they can act unilaterally to hold down their currency, to make their goods seem more expensive for us to purchase, then we have the right to act in our best interests, whether it is unilateral or not, to respond. that way we can give our workers and businesses a fair chance to compete. i did not know if i can ask you a question, mr. secretary, it because you have done remarkably good job of trying to explain how important this relationship with china is. i believe you're trying to speak not just to us and the american people but to the chinese as well. i hope that some of us are able to speak to you and to communicate to the chinese people and government to say that this is not about trying to get on the case of the chinese. we have seen this picture before. we did it over a century ago. people are wondering where we came from when we became number one. i thi
to deal, even with current law, one is to make sure that we can use our accountability law and our anti-dumping law, and our import safety laws to make sure they are protected from both on fair trade practices and surges from china in imports. we are losing -- we are using those laws very effectively. we have a right, under the wto, secondly, to make sure that when china is doing something else in china that limits our excess or unfairly discriminates, we can take them to the wto and get them to stop those practices. we're using the very effectively. we have a long way to go. we are having an portent debate , region and partisan debate, not about the object -- and the important debate, not about the objective, but what additional sets of tools we can use. many of these practices have more adverse effects on other trading partners. we will try to use all those tools, and work with you and your colleagues to see if we can find better approaches. >> i appreciate your answers, and i encourage you to look at the currency reform for their trade act. with that, i will yield to the chairman. >>
will take a short break for lunch and at 1:30 p.m., we reconvened with panel 3 on the use of dispersants with three panelists. add to 30 5:00 p.m., panel four will focus on the future of onshore drilling, and we will have three panelists there. at 335 pm, panel 5 lil 0 -- focus on the response in the arctic. we will have five panelists. after a short break, we convene at 5:00 p.m. to begin the public comment period, and at 5:30 p.m., we will adjourn. any member of the public would like to submit a comment made do so via the web site at oilspillcommission.gov. we have a full agenda and we respect everyone's time. we asked all the panelists to please stay within the time limits in order to allow ample time for the commissioners to ask questions. there is a timekeeper right here in front who will monitor the time. we ask the panelists to please begin to summarize their remarks when they reach the timekeeper's one minute mark. i give control of the meeting to our cochairs, senator bob graham and the honorable william reilly. >> thank you. winston churchill described in event as not being the
'll be back at 7:00 eastern time, thank you for joining us. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >>. what's in 2007, analysts meredith whitney was the first to predict major losses for citigroup. she said -- our guest tonight on c-span's q&a. >> next, a discussion on the image of muslims in the u.s.. some of the topics are the controversy over the proposed islamic center near ground zero in york city. it is an hour and half. >> we welcome you to our briefing. and we have a distinguished panel year before you to talk about -- we call it a discussion. i want to be clear that this briefing is not about park 51. none of the panelists here are experts on the project or connected directly. this is not about park 51. the congressional muslim the staff association does not necessarily endorse the positions of the panelists here. we want to bring together experts and community leaders to talk about conversations in the wake of this controversy that is taking place all across america. it is a complex conversation that we're having right now. the muslim staff association represents a
again. that saving that they are doing is going to help us in the future as we reinvest and stabilize and grow out of this. host: you do get more information logging onto nsba.b is -- jeff from florida. good morning. caller: i have a questn and a concern. theatriot long for veterans. wondering if there is any activity for met -- patriot loan. guest: in terms of? caller: loaning down to usf veterans. host: you need to start business? caller: to gain some monetary to help us of parrot guest: as i am sure you know, there are a number of programs through the re sba to help veterans. senator kerry is to be chairman of the commanding, and was a lead in veterans business issues and did put together that bill. i have to go back and see where things stand with passage right now. but we certainly have been supportive of efforts to get more cash into the hands of both the veterans businesses and all small businesses. host: upstate, new york -- upstate new york, binghamton. caller: i just wanted to say that i am amazed at the ignorance of this administration. you are postulating now that small bu
, everyone, this tuesday morning. today on "washington journal," we want to get your thoughts on the right u.s. education system, the problems and solutions. president obama yesterday talking about the issue, saying we need to add one month to the school year, citing competitive nest for the united states. also, you have seen it on msnbc, and democratic candidates are talking about the issue as well. so it is your turn this morning to weigh in. what of the problems and solutions? all numbers are on your screen right there. we will get to your calls in just a minute. and remember, you can send us a or an e-mail. let me show you this headline. "new york daily news." let's add a month to the school year. year. the president backs and longer school year. then also the front page of the story, the president saying the d.c. public schools don't add up to private education. that is from the present yesterday as well. then there is a "the washington post" this morning with the headline. democratic candidates blast the gop over education policies, in search of a rallying issue. it looks like candidates
has the impact been on the scientists now using n.i.h. funding for embryonic stem cell research in terms of the uncertainty of the future? number two, what results have been taken in a positive sense, which i know are very good for the more than $500 million already expended? and what has been the consequence of the $10 million in the stimulus package where you informally told me that it has created the tremendous excitement and a new wave of enthusiasm by researchers who had been discouraged by the failure of congress to keep the pace, which we have moved from $12 billion to $30 billion, but failure to keep the pace in funding since 2003? >> senator, thank you for the question. and let me first say how appreciative i am personally and everyone at n.i.h. is for the strong leadership you have shown over these years in your advocacy for the value of medical research, and especially because we're talking about it today for stem cell research, that has been much appreciated, and your articulation of the importance has always been right on target, as it just was here in your opening
a reporter, i am all about news you can use. on this panel, we have hand- selected amazing folks, each an expert in the runway on different angles of reintegration within the military and the civilian world. i am going to bounce around a little bit. out of courtesy, i like to start with our wounded warriors. front and center, we have michael. he is a recently retired wounded warrior. he has a long medical road ahead. as a former army ranger and sergeant first class, michael is adapting to this change in mission. between ongoing surgery's, he is speaking to troops about reintegration and suicide prevention, even going back to iraq, where he was hit by an ied to talk to troops. optimisticht iis his mother and full-time caregiver. they have been blessed because she says when you look at mike, she worries about those who have unseen injuries and their families in need help reintegrating. down on me and, we have -- down on the end, we have a former marine reservist. she brings a unique perspective on reintegration trade as a female wounded warrior, as a full-time student, and as eight men t
this morning is what is america's core competency in your mind. if you would like to tell us how that can be nurtured by our leaders, we would like to hear that as well where we are going to get to your calls right away if we can get our producers to get some calls on the line while we are talking to you about america's core competency. we went to wikipedia which, as you know, is the self edited by people all rumble world really -- all are around the world really. we want to give you some statistics about the united states for its land mass. over 3.79 million square miles. 300 million people. the united states is the third or fourth largest country by a total area and the third largest both by land area of population. it is one of the world's most ethnically diverse and multi- cultural nations, the product of a large-scale immigration from many countries. the u.s. economy is the world's largest national gdp of $14.30 trillion and a quarter of the nominal global gdp and one-fifth of the gdp at purchasing power parity. that is the size and the economics of the united states. one of the poss
're on our twittergate. pat is joining us on the republican line from maryland. caller: i did not understand the agency that the recession was over. host: it is a group of economists. they said the recession ended in june of 2009. caller: obviously, they are not traveling around the country. if you will take a look at what is happening -- i go to hoses every day of people. in an insurance agent. i speak with people lost their jobs and their wives have lost their jobs as well. their children are dropping out of school. making $9 an hour to support their families. mr. obama is way off when it comes to understanding what's going on in the country. what is going on is more jobs are being lost. we just lost 12 of hundred more jobs at the steel plant in this city. 700 more jobs at the company that brings the food in for the two stadiums in baltimore city. another company just went bust. that was 1500 jobs. this is every single week for a new place is closing. you cannot tell me there is the recession over. the recession is going to last. i think it's gone to last another two years or three years.
of manhattan and brooklyn and you can see pictures of this in front of us. into this toxic crowd ran firefighters and police and other first responders. first responders came from all 50 states to aid in the rescue and cleanup of the subsequent days. the environmental protection administration, e.p.a., despite ample evidence to the contrary kept falsely proclaiming that the air was safe to breathe. it wasn't. the terrorists caused environmental catastrophe but the federal government compounded the damage by telling people the environment was safe when it wasn't and now thousands of people are sick and in need of special care. we have a moral obligation to treat those who became ill and that's what this bill is all about. for eight years representative maloney and i supported a bipartisan basis by the new york delegation and others have worked to bring this bill to the floor. now it is finally time to pass it. time and again, as we move this bill through the legislative process, we've adjusted it, reduced its size and scope, limited its cost and made concessions to broaden the coaliti
carefully at other countries. join us essential experience, international economist could examine the origins of the banking and currency crises in some detail. they have devoted considerable research tohe international contagion of financial crises, a related topic of obvious relevance to our recent experience. finally, macroeconomic modeling must accommodate the possibility of unconventional monetary policies and number of which have been used during the crisis. earlier work on this topic relies on the example of japan, now, unfortunately, we have more data points. the experience of the united states and the united kingdom with large-scale asset purchases could be explored this is that we can understand the affect of these transactions and how they could be incorporated into modern models. i began my remarks by drawing a distinction between the scientific, engineering, and managementspects of economics. for the most part, the financial crisis reflected problems in economic engineering and economic management. this private-sector arrangements, for exame risk management and fundin
for being with us from the north slope. can you talk a little bit about the interaction you have had with shell and their plans to develop up there and whether the is use your raise in your testimony you have been able to address satisfactorily or if there are other issues you would like resolved before they proceed? >> thank you, commissioner. the overriding concern continues to be the possibility of an oil spill. [inaudible] our problem is the oil spill equipment and the technology has never been tested here in the arctic in real-life situations due to the rules of the united states. because there has never been any real exercise here in the arctic involving broken ice conditions and the recovery of oil. it is the burning that is being mentioned, the technology being used in warmer waters, it has never been done up here and that continues to be our concern. it is difficult to take the words of industry and agencies just that their words. that is the overriding condition. the least-sale provisions i mentioned earlier continue to be the focus for the lower 48 waters. the time frame f
others to move with us. a little background. the threat. it is changing. since the end of the cold war, while the chances of an all-out global nuclear war have declined significantly, thank god, i think the chances of a nuclear strike have increased. during the cold war, the american, nato, and soviet military's were diligent and professional in the way we handle our nuclear-weapons. but we were also very lucky. we had several near misses, including but not limited to the cuban missile crisis. if we think that our luck will hold out with nine nuclear states and growing, plus the spread of technology to enrich the new clear -- and rich uranium, i think the world must think i knew. nine countries have nuclear weapons now. more are seeking them. terrorists are seeking nuclear weapons and nuclear. -- and i have no doubt that certain groups would use them if they had them. the know-how and capability to build a nuclear weapon is widely available, something we thought would only be the province of nations years ago. but it has changed. with the goal of nuclear power, and we will be talking a
us to the edge with wall street. i keep saying to voters that they need to keep pushing and keep the democrats in their. keep pushing, folks. host: you can join the conversation online, the twittered page is twitter.com/c- spanwj. or you can send us an e-mail and journal@c-span.org. we welcome our listeners that listen to was on radio. this is from the weekend edition of "the wall street journal." host: one final point from her -- "what is the mainstream media getting wrong in getting right? of the media does not appreciate how livid people are with washington." host: by the way, new polls are showing barbara boxer ahead in california. matt dillon says from arlington, texas, good morning, welcome to "washington journal." caller: thank you for taking my call. i just wanted to comment on how the movement that the tea party has, gosh, we are just tired all the losses and misplaced promises that the people always seem to give us. we had a grassroots movement for everyone. republicans, democrats, and tea party yeariers. this new financial reform bill has nothing to do with that, they
spurred that the national and local level the u.s. will lose. what do you think? the numbers to call -- you can also e-mail us. and we are on twitter. "curb corruption or lose the war" from "the wall street journal." the author of "why vietnam matters. " he draws on his own experience in vietnam. he starts out by saying -- so, what do you think? curb corruption or losing the war? will that be putting the american effort in jeopardy in afghanistan? "the wall street journal" has this piece. the piece says -- our question for you this morning, is there a danger in the u.s. losing the war in afghanistan do to problems of corruption, and bought more perhaps by the cia, trying to do the right thing and aligning itself with informants, but did they take advantage of the system? "the washington post" has an excerpt modified from "obama's wars." uc and in this year, president obama visiting arlington national -- you see in this here, president obama visiting arlington national cemetery. the peace in "the washington post" says -- so, we are seeing a little bit of the behind-the-scenes give- an
in the white house. >> i think it depends on whether my cubs are playing. it is actually very useful because it can keep track of what is going on. well, politico of course. [laughter] and now google things all the time. but i have many -- most of the news organizations, have on there. i do have a few sports applications on there to keep track of that. one thing i have on their that was a bad mistake is pac-man. i was more time than i should, even in meetings as i am listening to people, doing that. i am breaking my personal records all the time. >> david axelrod, thank you for sitting down with us today. >> we continue our innovation in democracy program by bringing back mike allen from politico for next interview, with epilepsy, the former chairman of the republican national committee, among many positions. your brother. mike allen, thank you. [inaudible] >> i started out by parking cars. >> honest work. >> was in the basement and one of those typical. 18 years later, i was chairman on the top four calling people at home for money for the republican party. in those days, you wanted to make
third parties and subsequently use in your operations? >> we've put in a full array of testing. we're taking samples from every incoming load. we've talked to all of our vendors for them also to do testing. we're doing a composite on these loads weekly and send them in for testing. we're going to do a monthly swabbing of our feed mill. we are currently in the process of completely cleaning and disinfecting the entire mill from top to bottom. and we've done extensive employee training to make sure that the mill is kept tightened up so that there's no open hatches as noted in the 483. >> what steps do you take to ensure that those planned or announced safeguards are implemented? >> we have a daily inspection by the mill manager. then we have an outside supervisor who is going to inspect the facilities once a week and give me a full report. >> do you still have your hog operations? >> we own some hog facilities but we don't own any -- we don't operate hog facilities. we just lease them. >> i see. mr. chairman, i note with some distress my time is up, and i thank you for your courtesy.
. whichever fuel or energy sources used, it will require infrastructure. it's very difficult to build out eight different types of infrastructure to meet that kind of broad technology platform. i think we will have some hard choices as a nation to make about what our future transportation fuels will be. that is part of what this study is hoping to shed a great deal of light on. again, as i've said before, there is no question that for many years to come, the internal combustion engine, fuelled by hydrocarbons, particularly crude oil, or going to be a dominant form of transportation here in the united states. >> should oil exploration be permitted in the great lakes? >> that is a great question. from a geologic standpoint, i don't know if the great lakes has exploration potential. in terms of whether or not people would want to explore there are not, i just don't know. as to whether it could be done safely and environmentally responsibly, absolutely. ours is an industry that operates in many hostile environments in terms of weather and climate and other things. i know the great lakes can h
europeans, they were well educated, emigrating to the u.s.. last year there were only three within the group by participated in. my colleague graduated in u.s., spending $200,000 of her own money on education. she went back to europe, and in these other countries that have no immigration -- no education and the immigration is a policy provided to the u.s.. guest: our population is multifaceted. our program shows that every time a child is given the chance, they can learn. in arkansas there was not much of a european population. all of those kids were achieving. the poverty level was 85%. we are proving again that kids can achieve, given the proper courses and teacher training. host: tom luce, thank you for talking to our viewers. guest: thank you. host: go to our website, c- span.org, to find out the events we are covering today in washington. the president will give his back to school speech at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. a stakeout after meeting with caucus members with mitch mcconnell after the meeting on the small business bill. live coverage on c-span 2. thank you for watching.
talk about a meeting in september of 2009, when the word traditional was used, what were the words she used to your recollection? >> the ones i have a mile written statement. >> would you refer to the words he said she specifically said? -- you said she specifically said? >> that is page 13. the bottom of page 13, the top of page 14. >> i have a larger print. >> mr. chairman, would you mind if the answer that question? thank you. >> ok. >> my recollection is that she used the term traditional types of section two cases, and the terms of political equality for racial and language minority groups, and the term "that is what we are all about." >> ok. thank you. >> ok, if that is your answer. >> thank you. in the last round of questioning you answered yes to my question of did anyone at that meeting where you were participating by conference ez about theer ri race hostile opposition to the boating rights act. were you one of the people who told him? >> yes. i remember specifically say in it because i knew about his testimony in front of congress, and i wanted mr. perez to know that i stron
week we have legislation. it is important for us to make things here in america. we have always been good at that. in making it in america, it lets people make it in america. maybe by now you may know that the senate is passing the small business credit bill. i understand it was imminent when we came down here. when they do, this legislation will help to create 500,000 jobs. it will reduce taxes is for small businesses. s and as we get the bill, -- we think we have some better ideas. the republicans in the senate have held it up. some of these issues will have to be in future legislation because small businesses cannot wait another day for this to be passed. i think it is important to know that august is officially over. in the first eight months of this year, the economy has produced more private-sector jobs than the eight years of the bill should ministration. more private sector jobs created in the first eight months of 2010 banned in eight years of the bush administration. we are here to preserve social security, tax cuts for the middle-class, we are not going back. we are here t
with us for " the washington journal" for this friday, september 10, 2010. the president is having a news conference at 11:00 a.m.. the question for the morning is -- is college overrated? this is from "the washington post" style section this morning. here is what the front page looks like this morning with the question, is college over rated. some families turned away from higher education and favor of real life lessons. but all numbers are on the screen and we will begin taking your calls in just a couple of minutes. on the phone to start the morning of is -- from "the washington post." talking about a taxes and tuition on capitol hill. what is the story you reported on yesterday? guest: we did a little story about how workers on capitol hill, 0 $9 million in back taxes to the government. host: is this a number we have been looking at in the economy for a while? guest: yes, the amount is about the same as in 2004, a 2005, 2006. but a drop-off in 2007. that means the number has gone up 37% in the past two years. host: is there a reason for this? guest: no one really knows because they do
their jobs. and today, mr. chairman, they are seeing us stand up for the american manufacturing and american workers and demand a level playing field and an end to china's currency manipulation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from texas. mr. brady: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: mr. speaker, it's now my pleasure, a deep privilege to yield a minute to our distinguished speaker, nancy pelosi. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. the speaker: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank you for the recognition and of yielding of time from the distinguished chairman of the ways and means committee. w and means committee. i think him for bringing this legislation to the floor and i thank mr. murphy -- bipartisan murphys for their leadership in this important legislation. mr. speaker, for so many years, we have watched china-u.s. trade deficit grow and grow and grow. and today, we are finally doing something about it by recognizing that china's manipulation of the currency
is by former u.s. attorney general michael mukasey. again, president obama will have an announcement this afternoon in the white house rose garden. we will have coverage at 1:30 p.m. eastern. until then, an author who has written a book critical of the obama administration. ng this friday, september 17, david limbaugh returns. his latest book is called "crimes against liberty: an indictment of president barack obama." as with the start -- start our discussion, for an author, had a new spirit of the lettuce nonfiction best-seller list. "the new york times" as the book and a number one spot, the second week on the list. "wall street journal" nonfiction, number two. and the combined list of fiction and nonfiction books at "usa today" #28, moving up and not -- #30. why is is selling so well? guest: i think it is resonating. people in america are very scared about what is going on about the bankrupting spending the federal government is doing and the destruction of our liberties and the assaults of individual liberties and assaults on the states, the war against the state, how president o
to a 2018? will the republicans take control of the chamber? she reminds us of the history. that year the republicans swept the house races. the republican majority and republican speaker, newt gingrich -- she writes that speaker nancy pelosi is a famously in no danger. it probably means something that she appears to have gone missing from the national scene. cbs had her at 11% approval rating among registered voters in march. republicans were beating democrats might tend points 54% to 24%. in the history of that poll, the gop has never led by more than five points. what do you think? is this 1994 again? will the republicans be able to surge ahead and take control of the house? the stock about governors' races. can they take strides there? what is that need to president obama and his time in office? she went to a conservative activist to give his taken things. he was a contributor to the "contract to america." he was the founder of "americans for tax reform." he was one of the most insightful political reserves -- observers. he noted that republicans in 1994 were not pulling as well t
for granted on a daily basis to live in freedom, to live in democracy. those are the ones who allow us to do. that today we have the opportunity to help make our soldiers and our veterans, to help transition them into civilian life much easier. h.r. 5282 will help to make opportunities available to the brave men and women who are returning from the fight on the global war on terror and this legislation will continue our commitment to our veterans through education and employment opportunities. and as part of the civil works mission, the corps of engineers, they uncover countless historic artifacts continuously. a lot of these artifacts, which are very important items, are frankly just uncatalogged and are just kind of almost semiabandoned and they need curation. so, this is such a commonsense bill. it helps preserve our history, preserve our past, while also making sure that we give opportunities to the most noble, to the best and the brightest of our country, to our troops and to our veterans. i urge all members to support our receipt advance and support this -- our veterans and support thi
speaking i would appreciate it. tell us your name and any ebullitions you might have. please wait. we have microphones coming around to you. >> thank you. i am mike billington. i do not know if you went to the conference in quantico last week, but at that conference are raise the exact question you have drawn, the elite of the chinese and russians and others that the evidence is an adequate. the response from different generals as we do not need no stinking evidence. [laughter] look at the provocations, it isn't their character, therefore we have to accept this is true. you did not mention the issue, which has concerned me about this, which is why in this area of very high south korean and u.s. and nato anti-submarine warfare facilities and sonar equipment and so forth there appears to have been no son are evidence whatsoever -- no sonar evidence whatsoever? we all know that north korea said they had nothing to do with this, but i am wondering what you did north korea thinks about this. in other words, who could have done it, who in the west? is that the british? whaty is the view of the n
's primary results. zero be on your screen. joining us this morning from our news desk is steve peoples from "roll call." let us begin with the headline from the delaware newspaper, anti-establishment insurgency rocks of delaware. o'donnell in shocker. tea party-backed candidates funds. how would she be able to do it? guest: not surprised here. the tea party express came into town against the wishes of some people in washington. spent a lot of money. in a closed republican primary was able to make a difference and up said cassell. honestly hard to see this as anything but a nightmare scenario for the gop, at least in this delaware race. you heard karl rove right off the race and both people on both sides are doing the same thing. host: people did not think she could win this primary, either. guest: two different races. winning a closed republican primary which -- i looked at the numbers, about 60,000 people voted, about one-tenth of all registered voters in delaware. about one third of registered republicans. a very small sample. you get enough of your friends and the excited base out, you c
freedom, and at least 12 of these nations are allowing open service and are currently fighting alongside u.s. troops in afghanistan. there's a cost involved in our current policy. according to a 2005 g.a.o. report, american taxpayers spend more than $30 million each year to train replacement for gay troops discharged under the don't ask, don't policy. the total costs reported since the statute was implemented, according to g.a.o., has been nearly $200 million and that doesn't count the administrative and legal costs associated with investigations and hearings. the military schooling of gay troops, such as pilot training and linguist training. we are losing highly-skilled troops to this policy. according to the g.a.o., 8% of the service members let go under don't ask, don't tell held critical occupations defined as services such as interpreters, 3% had skills in an important foreign language such as arabic, farsi or korean. more than 13,000 troops have been dismissed from the military simply because of their sexual orientation since president clton signed this law in 1993. mr. president, soci
're document, and engaging in a discussion. here are the phone numbers. if you are a democrat, join us. rep conditions, join us, and independents, join us. good morning once again, this is the kind of discussion i can promise you would only happen on c-span. 34 years ago we used to call us the place where the constitution came to live every day, because it gave you a running example of the three branches of government and the live coverage of the congress, executive branch and what we told you about the supreme court so we couldn't let constitution day go by without a discussion. seems like we're hearing more and more about it these days, and on the front page of the washington times in a story about constitution day, david eisner who runs the national constitution center in philadelphia explains why. here is the story. he writes -- the tea party has got people thinking more seriously about what's in the constitution and what's not. that's the quote from the political analyst with american enterprise institute but they say it would be wrong to assume tea party movement was -- >> supreme cou
to the middle east. >> direct negotiations among the u.s., israel, and the palestinian authority in pursuit of a final agreement, sediment, and just peace of two states living side by side -- settlement. george mitchell will answer a few questions, but we still have meetings going on. he will have to return upstairs to rejoin the negotiations. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. the parties have just concluded the first round of trilateral talks. the meeting lasted about an hour and a half. it began with a plenary session involving the full u.s., israeli, and palestinian delegations on the eighth floor of the state department, and then broke to a smaller meeting in the secretary of state's personal office involving prime minister netanyahu, president abbas, secretary clinton, and myself. prime minister netanyahu and president abbas then went into a separate meeting for a direct discussion. that meeting is still going on right now. in the trilateral meeting, there was a long and productive discussion on a range of issues. president abbas and prime minister netanyahu expressed their inte
, accounting, advertising. these jobs are overwhelmingly feel by u.s. workers, get these jobs disappear when forms are closed. economists believe that for every form job loss, the u.s. loses another 3.1 complementary jobs. aside from a loss of millions of jobs, the closure of american forms endangers the nation's economy and national security. our national security depends on our ability to produce a stable domestic crude supply. like oil, the more we rely on other countries for our food supply, the more recall victim to an increase trade debt, scarcity in times of drought, fluctuating eckstrom market prices, and political pressure. we would also increase the possibility of foodborne illness is and terrorist attack your nation's food supply. the security is national security. america cannot afford to stop producing its own food supply, and we need the labor force to do so. today we will hear from our panel of witnesses to better understand this complex and very important issue for americans, american jobs, our economy, and our national security. people in the media spotlight have a special a
-- they should have enough capital to cover all of their losses. host: ok, thank you. republican line. calling us from los angeles, at an early hour. caller: i wanted to comment. i don't think the government should help any firm, and there are no firms that are too large to fail. there are perfect bankruptcy laws that are printed on the books. we just have to let the strongest firms survive and those of that for some reason cannot maintain their costs, you have to let them go. we cannot interfere with our market system. host: thank you for your call. i mentioned about candidates. some candidates picking up on this theme. here is just one example. cathy rodgers, washington's fifth congressional district. on her website, she has a series of pledges should see is putting forward. no. 5, reversed the wall street bailout. saying she had voted against the $700 billion tarp the bill and now our goal should be to make sure something like tarp never happens again. no company is too big to fail. the only thing to big to fail as america itself. one candidate picking up on this theme of bailouts. let us go n
you so much for being with us on this wednesday. we will take you to the house of representatives live next. we will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. today the house is working hard to get out of here, we do not know the schedule will change, but we for sure know that one of the bills on their agenda today is a discussion about compensation for 9/11 first responders who have developed health problems. thank you for being with us. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] periods [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by the guest chaplain, reverend scott moore, doctorial student, germany. the chaplain: god of the nations, you have chosen many in various ways to show your pre
of us on the day as, you are free to wander back and get coffee. i want to thank everyone. we had a long and productive day yesterday. let me do a little housekeeping in terms of the schedule. we are supposed to have a series of three votes beginning at 11:00. so it is my intention to go without a break until those votes are called. wait until five minutes or 10 minutes into the first vote and adjourned until approximately 11:40 so everyone will have an opportunity to cast votes and we do not have to run back and forth. as soon as the third vote is cast, i will ask you to come back quickly so we can get in an hour between 11:40 and 12:40. then we will break for lunch and resume at 2:30. it is my intention to stay as late, almost as late as we did yesterday and hopefully we can get a lot more done. there was an objection yesterday come at a -- a motion by the house to admit into evidence that was 302. we have visited with our counsel and senator hatch and i have visited about it. the inclination is to not admit the 300 to as evidence for the same reasons we did not grand jury testimony in
for fresh apples, and they already produce over half of the world apples. if the u.s. is starved for labor, the chinese are ready to step in. in the face of a crisis, retrieving lost production will not happen quickly. average profitability does not really give a proper return given the risk that we take. for most of us, the reasons we stated our not economical. a major live goal for me is to provide jobs to as many people as possible. i am compelled to be able to pass on our farm to someone who will take it. labor shortages are not going to find me a willing buyer. it is a serious economic problem that congress has not addressed for far too long. now is the time. i am extremely supported -- supportive of this legislation. comprehensive reform may be too politically charged right now. please focus on agricultural jobs and get it passed. >> good morning. i would like to thank the chairman and ranking members of the committee for holding this hearing. i am the president of the united farm workers of america. joining me today are five farm workers. i would like to ask them to stand up. isabel
minutes november? if you want to weigh in via e-mail as well, you can do so. and if you want to use twitter. again, we take our focus for the 45 minutes for the front page story in the "wall street journal" this morning. taking a look at political story with speaker pelosi. this is out of washington. they write so it talks about the political journey that will take, the paper talks more about that. but for our 45 minutes we're using this as a springboard to hear from democrats only. we'll take e-mail and twitter affouf this question, too. one more section from the interior pages of the same story. the writers write this morning. so the numbers will be on your screen. to your calls looking at speaker pelosi this november. portland, yorle, on -- oregon, on our line who thinks she will help. caller: i think nancy pelosi has been consistent and correct in her political decisions. i think she is definitely good for the country. and we small -- small african american community are very strong supporters. i think that the media is kind of hyped up all the predictions about shrinking democr
for years and they have elected me to that. >> in new hampshire -- >> u.s. civil rights commission is holding a conference on civil rights in the 21st century and includes speeches and panel discussions on various aspects. business leaders and scholars discuss the legal and social tools available for fighting discrimination. >> including continued racial and ethnic disparities in important measures of well-being and success. this discussion obviously includes a consideration of public policy options, both old and new, but it goes beyond public policy by also asking about the limits of government action and what the right mix of government and nongovernment action should be. in a pre-conference conference call with the panel members, we identified the following questions as relevant. they don't have to answer them all, but i'm going to repeat them anyway and if they go off on more brilliant things i might turn them back to a few of these questions. first, beyond rigorous enforcement of anti-discrimination law, ca can and should be done by government to narrow racial and ethnic dispa
for your testimony. >> i am honored to testify today on behalf of the u.s. apple association and the agricultural coalition for immigration reform. i am a third-generation fruit farmer with operations in virginia. we employ from 30 to 155 workers, depending on the time of year. the fact that i appear before you today as a farmer with the president of u f w should send a very powerful message. we have a common problem. despite continued attempts at automation, apple's still need to be manually pruned and hand- picked. the work as physically demanding and a certain amount of skill is necessary. apple's bruce greatly -- apples bruise easily, and improper picking will greatly reduce the value of our crop. today, farmers rely on legal and illegal workers. without a solution, farms will fail. we will export jobs and lose our food. government statistics tell us that 80% of farm workers are foreign-born, and half of those are unauthorized. only 2%, are coming in through the existing program. many believe that native-born workers will harvest american specialty crops, however, the tak
and anger, you are not behind anything that will be prosperous or positive. bringing us a better america where we are not fighting all the time. abraham lincoln even said this. we will falter with them, it will not be an outside force. just look in the mirror. host: all right. independent line, connecticut. caller: a quick comment, it is hard to tell where to party members stand on the issues. if you look at rand hall in kentucky, if you look at the way that they have been constructed and guided, not to speak critically on the issues, it is hard to tell where they stand conservatively. host: going back to "the wall street journal" this morning -- host: also in the papers this morning, an update on the alaska primary, "seeking a way out of the ft." -- out of the ft." -- defeat." host: long island, n.y., republican line. caller: i agree with the editorial. i am as fiscally conservative as you can get, but there is no point in republicans forming a circular firing squad. we need to vote for the people that can vote for the republicans who can win the election and make significant gains in c
if they can find a job, and save that space for hardnd criminals that put us at risk. we cannot afford to how's these people. i mean, actually some of them live better than our poor. so i hope this is a turn and i hope other states will take this on. and i really love c-span. it's so important these days. thank you so much. host: thanks for the phone call. we'll keep talking about this. but first, we want to get a quick update about the afghanistan elections. joining us on the phone is paul tate, with reuters and the afghanistan bureau chief. mr. tate, if you could tell us about the headlines that we're seing in this morning. here's one of them. afghan vote marred by irregularities. guest: good morning. it's certainly true there have been thousands of irregularities, we're told, even before voting began. thousands of voter registration cards, ink that was meant to identify people as having voted could be washed off. we even found some kids with bottles of bleach standing outside polling stations showing voters how to wash the ink off. the counting will take a very, very long time. so we're no
is crossing the table. and they are able -- their business model is basically to use the power of their monopoly or duopoly position to extract more and more revenue from folks who are dependent on this service that is essential for the transaction -- the sale of gas, the sale of grocery -- to occur. and that business model that i think we have to reward is the hard work and good service and high quality and a fair price. and our merchants, individual merchants, have no capacity to protect themselves on the cost of each transaction. and when you have electronic transactions, they are pretty simple to do. there is an expense involved. the price as charged has to be fair. and unless you have a cop on the beat -- in this case, the federal reserve writing regulations to make certain the banks don't overreach so the charges are reasonable and proportionate -- you will see merchants getting hammered with because they can't control. it eats into their profits and their viability. this i think is overdue. other countries have a much lower cost per transaction, and their economies do fi
. mr. neal: madam speaker, more than 100 years ago the first u.s. mutual fund was started in boston. mutual funds have been a way of life for every man to invest in the market. with the benefits of pooling and diversification. it invites the term mutualization. today more than 50 million households invest through mutual funds with a median household income of $80,000. more than 50% of 401-k assets were invested in mutual funds at the end of 2009. h.r. 4337 was introduced last year by mr. rangel and i to modernize the tax laws regarding to regulate investment companies, better known as mutual funds. a technical explanation and revenue table for this bill may be found on the joint tax website, www.jtc.gov. the tax rules that relate to mutual funds date back to more than half a century. although those rules have been updated from time to time, it's been over 20 years since they were last revisited. the bill before us today would make several changes to the tax code to address outdated provisions such as rules that relates to preferential dividends and rules to mutual funds to send noti
, this has helped us a lot combat the production. we formed in east tennessee, what was the southeast tennessee meth task force which was a local, state and federal partnership because methamphetamine production can't be combat the exclusively at the state and local level. they just simply can't. they didn't have the resources to surveil it. it becomes a toxic site where it is made, so they didn't have the resources to clean it up. and it grew to be the east tennessee meth task force and now it is a statewide task force. we have had tremendous success. but we have to continue to modernize the laws, including federal component in order for drug professionals to be able to keep it out of the hands of people who are addicted, because they produce this, most of the time, for use. and as a result, this is just a deadly, deadly disease out in the hinterland of america and we have to fight it. this bill is another step in the right direction. congressman gordon and i worked together and congressman cooper passed a bill a few years ago to create federal grant support of the children who are t
had opportunity and a number of positions with the u.s. department of justice and putting assistant to the supreme court cases he was the number two man at the civil rights division at the department justice and the environment division and he also served as vice president and general counsel to the center for public policy where he batted it and wrote a variety of publications and legal issues of interest to business and he's contributing editor to among other things "national review" online and writes frequently for usa today, the weekly standard, and several other periodic journals. finally, professor james patterson is the fourth foundation professor of history emeritus at browne university. he is a graduate of williams college and worked as a reporter for the harvard and summer, hartford current prior to joining harvard university where he received his ph.d. in history. his recent publications include grand expectations the united states 1945 to 1974 for which he received the bancroft prize in history be read about property, from the board of education, civil rights milestone a
for us is trying to get our six-party friends led by china to work with us to try to convince who's ever in leadership in north korea that their future would be far better served by denuclearizing, and that remains our goal. >> as always, thank you so much. [laughter] for coming here, first of all, but also giving such a thorough and complete and comprehensive talk about american foreign policy. and i know i speak for everyone that we wish you godspeed and more in your work next week and >> on c-span tonight, president obama talks about the economy during a visit to the ohio. jo bonner holds a town hall meeting in his district. the democratic national committee holds a -- an event in philadelphia. former gov. george pataki focuses on health care. >> at long last, the united states of america joins every other nation in the world to say that health care is a right, not a privilege. >> we have been covering town hall meetings. what's them on line at the c- span a video library. they are searchable and free on your computer any time. the c-span networks -- we provide coverage of politics, p
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